Camino de Santiago walking holidays
Camino de Santiago walking holidays Camino de Santiago walking holidays
walks in spain walks in spain

Camino de Santiago Walking Tours

walks in spain
walks in spain
walks in spain
walks in spain
Camino de Santiago Walking Holidays
Camino de Santiago Walking Holidays
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Walks in Spain

Here are the questions we are frequently asked, we hope they cover all of yours however if there is something we’ve missed let us know and we will be happy to answer it and add it to our FAQs page:

What will the holiday be like?
Special is probably the best word to describe it. The Camino de Santiago (French Way) is unique not only because it is a journey of the soul and spirit but also because you will be walking through a beautiful, varied landscape in the company of many interesting like-minded souls some of whom may become long lasting friends or acquaintances.
On a typical day, whatever the speed of your travel you are bound to meet other pilgrims to share experiences with either as you walk or at rest stops. This is what makes the Camino so magical.
And you walk with the reassurance of knowing that when you arrive at your next stop-over you will have somewhere comfortable to stay and eat already booked.

From Sarria onwards (the last 110kms) the Camino is not challenging and consists mainly of short flat stretches alternating with small hills – rolling countryside. The terrain underfoot is good being a mixture of sandy paths, tarmac roads and some stony lanes.

From Astorga to Sarria there are two long climbs and two long descents, one steep for a short way but with a more gentle road alternative. The descents can be a little stony.

From Leon to Astorga the Camino is mainly flat with many vineyards.
There are stretches where the Camino is a path alongside roads – in a very few cases busy.

From Sarria to Santiago there are frequent refreshment and toilet facilities, before Sarria these are less frequent and are pointed out in the notes and maps that we provide you with which will also give details of ascents and descents, distances and places of interest.

And don’t forget your grand arrival in Santiago! This is one of the most satisfying experiences you can enjoy and you will feel a real kinship with your fellow pilgrims as you enter the famous cathedral!


Where will I be staying?
In all cases your accommodation will be the best available, usually 2* or 3* hotels or guesthouses, except in the larger towns where we give you the choice of either the more exclusive hotels that are available or budget but good accommodation.
In smaller locations where the choice is limited you may be staying in a small guesthouse, which will be of good quality. The accommodation we use has your own private bathroom, and where this is not available we will advise you before we book that property. Some hotels will have Wifi or Internet and laundry facilities and all will of course provide towels and bed linen so sleeping bags are not necessary!

Very Important! The Camino is quite rightly a popular pilgrimage and therefore at certain times of the year there can be a shortage of good accommodation. We do not compromise on the quality of accommodation that we expect our guests to stay in and therefore where there is none available that meets our standards we will arrange for you to be transferred by taxi to the nearest suitable one.
The earlier you book the more chance of getting the best accommodation.


What are the meal arrangements?
With all holidays breakfast is included. This can vary and as a minimum will be continental however in some of the places may include hams and cheese and cooked food.
Dinner if included will usually be where you are staying and will be the menu of the day, which usually has a choice of starters, main course and sweet. Drinks are not included with the meals. Please let us know if you have any special dietary requirements, we are usually able to arrange for these.
Lunch is not included as there are plenty of places to eat en-route and this gives you the opportunity to try local dishes and meet other pilgrims. We supply you with a comprehensive menu translator as part of your welcome pack. This will also tell you something about the local dishes.
If you would prefer on some days to have a picnic lunch your hotel may be able to provide it or there may be shops nearby where you can buy provisions. The notes we provide you will have details.
Please note the eating times are different in Spain – Breakfast is rarely served before 7.00am and Dinner is usually not available until after 8.00pm.


Can I have my luggage transferred?
You certainly can. We will provide you with luggage tags that need to be displayed at all times and make the necessary arrangements. Your luggage will need to be in reception by 8.30am and is usually delivered to your next hotel by 4.30pm. The luggage transfer is limited to 1 bag per person with a maximum weight of 20kg per bag. If you need more let us know and we will quote!


How do I follow the Camino?
It couldn’t be easier as this is probably the best way-marked walking route in the world – just follow the yellow arrows and scallops! We do also however provide you with maps and comprehensive route notes to make your journey more interesting.


How do I get the Compostella (certificate of completion)?
To qualify for the Compostella you must have walked the last 100km of the Camino and prove it by having a Pilgrims Passport that has been stamped at sufficient places en-route. We will provide you with your passport as part of your welcome pack. We will also give you directions to the Pilgrim’s Office in Santiago.


How do I get to the start and finish points?
We are happy to provide advice and make arrangements for your travel to the start and finish of your holiday. Depending on where you start your Camino either Santiago or Madrid are the most common airports however if you are arriving elsewhere or by other means we are very happy to assist.


Will I be safe and will I meet other Pilgrims?
In the main the Camino is a very safe and friendly environment. You do need to take the normal common-sense precautions in towns and when you take a break however it is very rare for people to have problems. Each year many women make this pilgrimage alone without incidents and you will generally find local people very friendly and helpful.
You certainly will meet fellow pilgrims of all nationalities and this is part of its attraction.


What will the weather be like and when is the best time to come?
We offer our holidays from April to October, which tends to be the better months for walking.
Galicia is green and beautiful for a reason – it gets a lot of rain! As with other places this far south it can also get hot in the summer so when you choose to come should be determined by when you are available and what conditions you feel more comfortable in walking in.
Spring, early summer and early autumn are months when you will have a more comfortable temperature but should be prepared for showers or even rain. July and August can be hot but with far less likelihood of rain.
The high stages of the Camino before Sarria can be cool in spring and autumn.
Winter is chilly with snow at high levels and rain throughout Galicia.
www.worldweather.org will give you climate statistics under Spain, A Coruna.


Do I need vaccinations and what health precautions should I take?
You do not need any vaccinations for Spain however do ensure that if you do have any medical conditions that you feel may interfere with your enjoyment of the Camino check first with your doctor. Likewise do remember to bring any medication that you normally take and we also recommend bringing a small first aid kit.
It is a condition of our accepting your booking for this holiday that you have adequate travel insurance and if you are coming from the UK an EHIC from www.dh.gov.uk as this will be useful should you need to see a doctor.
Health facilities in Spain are generally good although as in most countries you may need to wait for minor things in Accident and Emergency departments.


What currency do I need and are there ATM’s?
The currency is the Euro and all towns and most larger villages will have ATM,s
Our notes will indicate villages that have these.


Will people speak English?
Except in the larger towns very few and indeed the language you are more likely to hear in the countryside will be Gallego. Everyone will understand Spanish however so we recommend taking a phrase book and in the main you will find most people very friendly and helpful.


What do I do in an emergency?
We give you full guidance on what to do in an emergency with your welcome pack and don’t forget that you will have available 24/7 both a Spanish and a UK helpline telephone contact.


What do I need to bring?
Here are some suggestions, the list is not exhaustive so do consider your own requirements:

Luggage - the baggage allowance is one item (maximum 20kg) per person. If you need to add more bags please contact us in advance.
Daypack (15-20L)
Good walking shoes with ankle support is recommended
Plenty of spare pairs of socks - hiking socks for walks and regular socks for evenings
Appropriate pants for hiking, i.e. not jeans
Light shoes/sandals (for evening)
Long pants for hiking
T-shirts or short-sleeved shirts
Long sleeved shirt
Polar fleece or a warm jacket
Underwear (thermal for winter trips)*
Warm hat and sun hat
Sunglasses
Water proof jacket or poncho in case of rain
Toiletries - toothbrush, toothpaste, soap etc
Water bottle
Extra clothing for cold sensitive*
Sun cream (preferably sweat/water resistant and of a high factor)
Plastic bags
*not necessary for all trips

FIRST AID
Plasters
Blister plasters
Aspirin/Paracetamol for headaches or other pain
Antihistamine tablets
Throat lozenges
Anti-inflammatory cream


SOME OPTIONAL EXTRAS


Extra underwear
Flashlight with extra batteries & bulb
Extra socks, extra T-shirts
Camera equipment
Binoculars
Collapsible plastic bucket or bowl for laundry
Some general antibiotics
Moist sealed mini paper towels
Powdered drink mix
Chocolate or candy bars
Needle and thread
Safety pins
Rip-stop nylon tape
Dental floss
Ace Bandage
Reading material
Walking stick or walking poles
Non-breakable glasses (if you wear breakable)
Small musical instruments like harmonicas
Playing cards…

Camino de Santiago Walking Holidays

Camino de Santiago Walking Holidays


Camino de Santiago Walking Holidays
Camino de Santiago Walking Holidays
Walks in Spain is the trading name of Walks in Spain S.L. registered as a Spanish Limited Company
 
Camino de Santiago Walking Holidays